» Www.love sex multiplex.com

Gracie

#1 | Movie Reviews

Gracie
Gracie is a by-the-numbers sports drama about a young girl who defies the odds to succeed in an all-male arena. It's the kind of thing that might make for a compelling after school special, but is hardly what one expects to spend $10 for at a multiplex. The film hits all the expected high notes of melodrama, does plenty of preaching from the pulpit, and comes to a rather abrupt conclusion (immediately after the expected moment of redemption/triumph). Yet for all its faults, Gracie is made with enough grace to get us rooting for the protagonist. This is due more to the heartfelt performance of actress Carly Schroeder than it is the less-than-inspired inspirational screenplay by Lisa Marie Petersen and Karen Janszen.

Gracie

Panic

#1 | Movie Reviews

Panic
Henry Bromell's Panic, is a perfect example of what the average independent film has become in 2000. It features recognizable stars and has the kind of storyline with the potential to play reasonably well in the average American multiplex. Like Grosse Pointe Blank, Analyze This, and TV's "The Sopranos", Panic features a premise that's quickly growing tired - that of a gangster/bad guy who visits a shrink. In this case, the patient is Alex (William H. Macy). Ultimately, the film is less about his relationship with his doctor (played by John Ritter) than about the reasons he's seeing a psychologist in the first place.

Panic

Love Serenade

#1 | Movie Reviews

Love Serenade
Winner of the Camera d'Or at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival, Love Serenade, the feature debut of Australian director Shirley Barrett, has the kind of nasty, biting wit that juries at film festivals seem to appreciate. For the most part, movies tend to tell the stories of love affairs between the "right" people, with romance and fate being an integral part of the mix. Love Serenade is a clear exception -- call it an anti-romantic comedy. And, unlike Ellen DeGeneres' failed Mr. Wrong, with which it shares a few superficial characteristics, Love Serenade is well-written and ably acted.

Love Serenade

10,000 B.C.

#1 | Movie Reviews

10,000 B.C.
I suppose there's some entertainment value to be had from the sheer badness of 10,000 B.C. The movie takes itself serious enough that, viewed from a warped perspective in a state of inebriation, it might actually be fun. Seen in more mundane circumstances, however - such as after paying $10 at a multiplex - it's anything but that. 10,000 B.C. is one of those movies where one is tempted to ask aloud, "What were they thinking?" Its across-the-board clumsiness is surprising. One doesn't expect intelligent scripting or deep characterization from Roland Emmerich, but the film's lack of energy, poor special effects, and monotonous pacing lead to an inescapable conclusion: 10,000 B.C. isn't only brain-dead, it's completely dead. It's inert and without a heartbeat.

10,000 B.C.

Royal Tenenbaums

#1 | Movie Reviews

Royal Tenenbaums
When I first heard the title of this movie, I thought it was a great ploy to release it around Christmas. Then I realized it was "Tenenbaums", not "Tannenbaums"... so much for that idea. Actually, Touchstone has elected a year-end release because they believe this movie, the third feature from critics' darling Wes Anderson (Rushmore), might have a shot at an Oscar or two. Despite the high profile cast, which features Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, Owen & Luke Wilson, Danny Glover, and Bill Murray, the movie probably has limited box office potential - it's a little too quirky for mainstream America. But the mercurial Academy may feel differently about the production than the multiplex masses - at least that's the distributor's hope.

Royal Tenenbaums

I Love You Too

#1 | Movie Reviews

I Love You Too
A commitment-phobe and a New Ager buddy-up to win over the women of their respective dreams.

I Love You Too

The Girlfriend Experience

#1 | Movie Reviews

The Girlfriend Experience
Steven Soderbergh makes two kinds of movies -- the Hollywood kind and the indie kind. Though let's be straight here: Even Soderbergh's indie films are essentially Hollywood. There's no risk involved with them from a financial perspective, and from the creative side they continue to lend the filmmaker the artsy street cred that allows him to go off and make big fluff films like Ocean's Whatever with impunity.

The Girlfriend Experience comes from the indie side of Soderbergh, a low-budget, quickly-made digital picture starring a cast of non-movie stars (though, in this case, not necessarily non-stars, depending on your knowledge of porn). It's far more enigmatic and challenging than any wide release multiplex picture you'll see these days, but does that automatically mean that it's better than those Hollywood types of movies?

The Girlfriend Experience

My Own Love Song

#1 | Movie Reviews

My Own Love Song
A wheelchair-bound singer and her best friend embark on a roadtrip to Memphis.

My Own Love Song

In Love and War

#1 | Movie Reviews

In Love and War
Reporter Ernest Hemingway is an ambulance driver in Italy during World War I. While bravely risking his life in the line of duty, he is injured and ends up in the hospital, where he falls in love with his nurse, Agnes von Kurowsky.

In Love and War

Solaris

#1 | Movie Reviews

Solaris
Solaris may be the first big budget science fiction motion picture that belongs in an art house rather than a multiplex. The movie bears a stronger resemblance to 2001: A Space Odyssey than to Star Wars, with an emphasis on ideas over action. Those expecting to see space battles and bug-eyed aliens will be disappointed. There's nothing like that here. The experience of watching Solaris doesn't just invite thought and rumination; it demands it.

Of his last four films, Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh has developed three remakes (besides this one, the other two are Traffic and Ocean's 11). Solaris is based on the novel by Stanisalw Lem, which was first brought to the screen in 1972 by Soviet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky. The earlier film, which clocks in at a lengthy 165 minutes, is as slow as it is fascinating. Soderbergh's re-interpretation, which is more economical (it's about 65 minutes shorter), has many of the same strengths as Tarkovsky's version without the somnambulant pace. Soderbergh's Solaris establishes a dreamlike state that allows events to unfold in an unhurried fashion without losing a patient audience's attention.

Solaris

Quarantine

#1 | Movie Reviews

Quarantine
It has become tiresome to travel to a multiplex seemingly every other Friday to see the latest remake of a foreign horror film. For the most part, the problem isn't that these productions are remakes but that they're bad remakes. In some cases, that's because the source material isn't good and in some cases it's because something is broken in the translation. The reason the term "remake" has developed a negative connotation isn't because the re-imagination of a story in another era or for a different culture is inherently flawed but because so many of them are produced without any concern for intelligence or artistry. Quarantine is an English-language remake of the 2007 Spanish horror film [Rec]. While the films are in many ways similar (with certain shots and passages of dialogue being identical), Quarantine fails to correct some of the problems evident in its predecessor while also incorporating a few defects of its own.

Quarantine

Must Love Death

#1 | Movie Reviews

Must Love Death
Disappointed by love, suicidal Norman arranges to meet some like-minded people. But when he arrives at the meeting the alleged suicides turn out to be unscrupulous killers looking for a willing victim. A comical and macabre fight against death begins.

Must Love Death

Mifune

#1 | Movie Reviews

Mifune
It's refreshing to see a movie in which there are no special effects, no camera tricks, and no incidental music to strum on a viewer's emotional strings. These are some (but certainly not all) of the tenets of Dogma 95, the much-ballyhooed "cinematic vow of chastity" taken by four Danish directors, one of whom, Søren Kragh-Jacobsen, is responsible for this film. In fact, Mifune is the third motion picture to receive the Dogma 95 seal of approval, following Tomas Vinterberg's The Celebration and Lars Von Trier's The Idiots (which has not been distributed in the United States). And, while I have an affinity for certain kinds of Hollywood overproduction, something like Mifune makes for a welcome contrast to the usual multiplex bombast.

Mifune

Mifune

#1 | Movie Reviews

Mifune
It's refreshing to see a movie in which there are no special effects, no camera tricks, and no incidental music to strum on a viewer's emotional strings. These are some (but certainly not all) of the tenets of Dogma 95, the much-ballyhooed "cinematic vow of chastity" taken by four Danish directors, one of whom, Søren Kragh-Jacobsen, is responsible for this film. In fact, Mifune is the third motion picture to receive the Dogma 95 seal of approval, following Tomas Vinterberg's The Celebration and Lars Von Trier's The Idiots (which has not been distributed in the United States). And, while I have an affinity for certain kinds of Hollywood overproduction, something like Mifune makes for a welcome contrast to the usual multiplex bombast.

Mifune

Love Stinks

#1 | Movie Reviews

Love Stinks
A movie about a relationship...thats worse than yours.

Love Stinks