A Passage to India

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A Passage to India
Adela Quested, a young Englishwoman, travels to India in the late 1920s to visit her fianc

A Passage to India

Americanizing Shelley

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Americanizing Shelley
Punjabi-speaking Shalini Singh lives a middle-classed lifestyle in the Himalayan region in India along with her mom, Kirat dad, Jaspal brother, Happy and sister, Littly, and was engaged to Neil Brar as a child. Years later Neil re-locates to the United States of America, and there is no contact between him and the Singh family but Shalini hopes to marry and live with him eventually

Americanizing Shelley

Jackass 2.5

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Jackass 2.5
The crew have now set off to finish what as left over from Jackass 2.0, and in this version they have Wee Man use a pee gun on themselves, having a mini motor bike fracas in the grocery mall, a sperm test, a portly crew member disguised as King Kong, as well as include three episodes of their hilarious adventures in India, namely drinking beer off of Shridhar Chillais several feet long fingernails having one of the crew lie on a bed of nails with two snakes - one on his chest and one between the legs, as well as a decorated elephant in the background and finally having a half-naked Indian Sadhu drink one of the crews urine.

Jackass 2.5

Sharpe's Challenge

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Sharpe's Challenge
In 1803 India, Sergeant Sharpe (Sean Bean) leads a patrol to an East India Company outpost. He arrives shortly before another supposedly friendly group of soldiers led by Major William Dodd (Toby Stephens). In a treacherous surprise attack, Dodd's men kill the entire garrison, leaving no witnesses, and makes off with the payroll. However, Sharpe is only wounded.

Fourteen years later, Sharpe, now a farmer in France, is summoned by the Duke of Wellington (Hugh Fraser) to his London home[1] to undertake one more mission for him, to find a man in India. The missing agent was trying to learn the identity of a turncoat officer advising a rebellious Maratha rajah. Sharpe refuses, unwilling to press his luck any further, until he learns that the agent is his old comrade in arms and best friend, Patrick Harper (Daragh O'Malley).

Sharpe's Challenge

Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love

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Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love
Tara and Maya are two inseparable friends in India. Their tastes, habits, and hobbies are the same. Years later, the two have matured, but have maintained their friendship. Tara gets married to the local prince, Raj Singh, who soon succeeds the throne as the sole heir. After the marriage, Raj gets bored of Tara and starts seeking another female to satisfy his sexual needs. He notices Maya and is instantly attracted to her. He has her included as one of his courtesans, and is intimate with her. Watch what happens when Tara finds out and the extent she will go to keep her marriage intact.

Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love

Where's the Party Yaar?

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Where's the Party Yaar?
Harishkumar S. Patel (Sunil Malhotra) is a geeky student from a small village in Gujarat, India who is attending the University of Houston, while living with his uncle (his father's best friend). His uncle, Dr. Bakshi, has an American-born son who's Hari's age, Mohan Bakshi (Kal Penn). Mohan, known as Mo, is a popular student at UH. He shows Hari around the college but then stays away from him because of Hari's nerdy ways.

Where's the Party Yaar?

Water

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Water
Water, a meditative drama that evokes the movies of the great Satyajit Ray, brings Deepa Mehta's "Elemental Trilogy" to a close. (The previous two films were Fire and Earth.) A film that takes a long, hard look at the second-class status of widows in fundamentalist Hindu society, Water has been battered, protested, and banned by elements of Indian society for what it depicts. Like Kandahar and Moolaadé, Water explores the exploitation of women in some societies, and how difficult life can become for those who oppose custom.

There is a tradition within fundamentalist Hinduism that when a woman is widowed, she has three options: (1) to throw herself on her husband's funeral pyre, (2) to marry his brother (if he has one and it is permitted by the family), or (3) to live in poverty in a group home for widows. Although Water transpires in 1938, an endnote indicates that this practice has not been entirely abolished in India. Director Deepa Mehta's intention to address this situation from a critical perspective resulted in widespread protests that forced her to shut down filming in India during 2000. After a delay of more than three years, Water was subsequently made in Sri Lanka under less-than-ideal circumstances.

Water

Sharpe`s Peril

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Sharpe`s Peril
Sharpe's Peril is a British TV drama that is based on the character Richard Sharpe from the Bernard Cornwell series of novels. All told, there are over 20 Sharpe novels that cover the time period from 1799 to 1821. Most of them take place during the Peninsular Wars - fought primarily in Spain, Portugal from 1807 through the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 at Waterloo.

Sharpe`s Peril

Outsourced

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Outsourced
In a welcome change from a growing number of dark, violent movies erupting in theaters this autumn, Outsourced is sweet and light. It's a celebration of cultural diversity and an affirmation that, despite differences in race, religion, and societal norms, people are essentially the same, with a lack of understanding being a key block to better relations. (Tell this to movies like Rendition, In the Valley of Elah, and Redacted, which posit something different.) This message is not hammered home in a heavy-handed manner. Instead, Outsourced is primarily a fish-out-of-water comedy with a little romance thrown in.

Outsourced

The Fourth Angel

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The Fourth Angel

An ordinary man remakes himself into a warrior after the death of his family in this thriller. Jack Elgin (Jeremy Irons) is a magazine editor living in London with his wife and three children. Elgin joins his spouse and his children as they set off for a trip to India, and when the plane lands due to mechanical failures, the flight is hijacked by terrorists from the "August 15th Movement," who insist on 50 million dollars in ransom from the United States government.

The Fourth Angel

The Man Who Would Be King

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The Man Who Would Be King
This adaptation of the famous short story by Rudyard Kipling tells the story of Daniel Dravot and Peachy Carnahan, two ex-soldiers in India when it was under British rule. They decide that the country is too small for them, so they head off to Kafiristan in order to become Kings in their own right. Kipling is seen as a character that was there at the beginning, and at the end of this glorious tale.

The Man Who Would Be King

The Way Back

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The Way Back
ďThe Way BackĒ is said to be about gulag escapees who, during World War II, trekked to freedom on a 4,000 mile journey from Siberia to India. Iím well aware that there are many true stories from that time about the triumph of the human spirit, but this particular story seems utterly impossible to me. Maybe itís because the film is based on an autobiographical book that has, for all intents and purposes, been debunked. Or maybe itís because director Peter Weir has flip flopped on the issue, on the one hand stating that the film is essentially fictional while on the other hand dedicating the film to those who made that journey. Then again, it could be something as simple as the way the film was written and shot. Whatever the case, this is one of the few World War II films that truly does seem like a work of fiction.

The Way Back

Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World

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Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World
Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World is a great title with a great premise for a not so great film. The comedy of Albert Brooks is delicate stuff - self-deprecating one-liners that need the perfect context to generate laughter. Films like Mother and Lost in America have given Brooks' humor the necessary framework; Looking fails to do so. While there are some amusing moments sprinkled throughout the production, the words "Looking for Laughter" seem oddly appropriate for a motion picture that never achieves the right level of comedic momentum.

Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World

Eat, Pray, Love

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Eat, Pray, Love
Eat Pray Love was more than just one woman's story from the very beginning-- writer Elizabeth Gilbert funded her year-long trip around the world with a publisher's advance, and experienced her stays in Italy, India and Indonesia with the knowledge that they would go into a book, and hopefully a successful one. The resulting bestseller phenomenon is something no one could have anticipated, but now that we have Eat Pray Love the movie, it's clearer than ever that Liz Gilbert, as played by Julia Roberts, is more avatar for all women than an actual human being. We watch her and her blond highlights and her tasteful clothes travel the globe because we cannot do the same, and whatever story might come along with it needs only to not get in the way of all the wish-fulfillment going on in the theater.

Eat, Pray, Love

Danny Bhoy: Live at Sydney Opera House

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Danny Bhoy: Live at Sydney Opera House
Danny Bhoy recently spent six months touring Australia and New Zealand and charmed the sell-out crowds with his effortless talent for storytelling and mischievous wit. As his popularity continues to grow internationally (Bhoy recently toured India), it was inevitable that a DVD recording of his sell-out show was on the horizon and thankfully this anticipated DVD release from Madman Laughs does not disappoint.The shows at the Sydney Opera House would mark the final leg of the Australian tour for the comedian, and as such all he has learned and observed about Australia is the main subject of the show. From confessing to his love of watching Parliament Question Time, to recalling his shocking discovery of just who is Humphrey B. Bear and detailing his eventful night in a Brisbane bar at closing time, Bhoy appears in command of the prestigious stage. Amongst the observational humour there is also Bhoys classic routines about the different Breakfast cuisines, his admiration of Scottish culture and the religious joke which resulted in a death threat.

Danny Bhoy: Live at Sydney Opera House